Philadelphia, Pennsylvania History

Built in 1682, it became the capital of Pennsylvania. With a well-equipped port, Philadelphia owed its rapid rise and growing maritime movement to trade. It was the great market for hired emigrants, especially Germans and Scots of Ireland; it rivaled New York in trade between the inland colonies and the motherland; he created the Academy in 1749, the first college in the United States, set up with modern criteria and honored by the great name of Franklin, built navigli. On the eve of the American Revolution, Philadelphia was regarded as one of the wonders of the world and when the first continental congress was convened (see below), it seemed well worthy of this honor to the deputies of the other American states. Due to its importance as an objective of the English army, was occupied by the British general Howe on 25 September 1776. Washington attempted to free it, but was defeated at Germantown on 4 October 1776. However, Philadelphia was a new Capua for the British and General Clinton, Howe’s successor, decided to evacuate it in 1778 to concentrate all his efforts around New York. After the war of independence ended, the Convention was convened in Philadelphia (see below) which gave a constitution to the United States in 1787. Later Philadelphia was rather Anglophile for its commercial interests and was a supporter of Jackson (see), in the great political struggles of the first decades of the century. XIX. A modern and populous city, Philadelphia was among the first American cities to feel the phenomena of pauperism, socialism and syndicalism. The first federation of trade unions (the Mechanic’s Union of Trade Association) and one of the first trade union newspapers, the Mechanic’s Free Press, arose in Philadelphia, as well as the first politically organized groups of workers in 1828. In Philadelphia, always in the vanguard of all progress, a stronghold of the anti-slavery Quakers, the American Anti-Slavery Society was born in 1833. In the Civil War, Philadelphia participated warmly. In 1876 an international exhibition was held there for the first centenary of North American independence and solemn festivals were celebrated there in 1882 for the second centenary of the founding of the metropolis. The Catholic religion flourishes in Philadelphia, an archdiocese since 1875. In 1876 an international exhibition was held there for the first centenary of North American independence and solemn festivals were celebrated there in 1882 for the second centenary of the founding of the metropolis. The Catholic religion flourishes in Philadelphia, an archdiocese since 1875. In 1876 an international exhibition was held there for the first centenary of North American independence and solemn festivals were celebrated there in 1882 for the second centenary of the founding of the metropolis. The Catholic religion flourishes in Philadelphia, an archdiocese since 1875.

Philadelphia Convention. – According to campingship, Philadelphia was the seat of the two continental congresses, which initiated and declared the struggle for the independence of the United States, and the Convention, which gave a constitution to the United States itself.

The first congress opened its works on September 5, 1774 and was attended by representatives of 12 states. Since the congress did not have the power to make laws, nor to vote for taxes, and each colony was entitled to only one vote, it legally assumed the character of a diplomatic conference, in which the representatives of twelve sovereign states were gathered. The Tory party was very strong in the congress, which did not want a detachment from England and tried to work out a compromise formula, but the most heated party managed to impose the deliberations of 20 October 1774, according to which from 10 December 1774 there was no they should have received more English goods and from 1 December 1775 North American exports to England should have ceased.

The second congress opened after the Lexington clash (10 May 1775) against the English. Petitions and addresses were attempted to the king, but, since he proclaimed the rebel colonies on August 23, 1775, the congress broke relations with the motherland, opened ports to foreign nations, invited the colonies that did not yet have it to give themselves a constitution. autonomous, and, at the motion of a deputy from Virginia, Richard Henry Lee, the independence of the United States was proclaimed on July 4, 1776.

The Convention held its first session on May 25, 1787. There were 65 deputies from the various states, but only 55 were present, the majority being lawyers, although there was no lack of landowners and merchants. The most diverse political trends were represented, but conservative currents prevailed. Washington was acclaimed as President of the Convention. The sessions were secret and only in 1840 did one of the most influential members of the Convention, Madison, publish the accounts. The great political contrasts of the United States emerged: large states, which wanted proportional representation to the population, and small states, which were for equal representation for all; north anti-slave and south slave; ultra-conservative aristocrats like Alexander Hamilton and Democrats like Franklin; centralizing and decentralizing tendencies.united states : history).

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania History